Archive for the ‘Websites’ Category

Top articles of 2016 revealed

December 16, 2016

It doesn’t seem long ago that I talked about the top 100 journal articles for 2015 as ranked by analysis of altmetrics. Altmetrics – literally alternative metrics – explore the impact of research. To consider altmetrics is to look at how many times an article is tweeted about, how many likes it gets, how many times it is mentioned in the media, how often it is blogged about and whether or not it gets any Wikipedia mentions.

One of the organisations that measures impact in this way is Altmetrics: you may have seen the brightly-coloured ‘doughnuts’ appearing next to journal articles on some platforms. Each year, Altmetrics publishes its top 100 articles and just like last year, the results are fascinating. Something that struck me immediately was that many of the highest ranked articles this year concern world events and concerns: for example, in the No. 1 position is an article about Barack Obama. Others that appear in the top 20 include articles on the Zika Virus, and an article by Robin Williams’ widow on her late husband’s illness. Compare this to the 2015 list, which contained articles on equally emotive topics – for example, plastic waste in oceans and antibiotic resistance – but did not have as great an emphasis on what we might term articles relating to ‘popular culture’.

Of course, that might not indicate anything at all, but it’s interesting. Barack Obama has been very much in the news this year; the Zika Virus was another subject of intense media coverage. When people are looking for information on either of those topics, the likelihood is that they will turn to a search engine, and their search may well have led them to an open access, academic article.

A number of these are articles are open access articles, so they can be accessed without having to login to anything, and access does not depend on having an institutional subscription.

The full list of the top 100 articles as ranked by Altmetrics is available here.

New: Subject Guides

September 16, 2016

Yesterday I mentioned a development that we have been working on over the summer to make it easier for you to access information on subject-specific resources. Those of you who are used to using our pages to access subject-specific information may have spotted that the Resources by Subject link that on the library web pages has changed to Subject Guides.

Follow the link and you will see a list of Subject Guides, one for each course area, and each containing information about accessing our services, links to relevant databases, useful websites, library publications that may be of use and more besides. We recognised that some of you found it difficult to access the information you need to undertake your studies, so we hope that our new list of Subject Guides will be helpful. Each Subject Guide also includes contact details of your Subject Librarian.

If you ever need any help with accessing resources, don’t hesitate to get in touch!

Exploring the Top 100 articles of 2015

December 15, 2015

Something fascinating to share this morning. Those of you who have had research published might well be aware of something called altmetrics, which are items of information about research articles that go beyond citation factors, H Indexes and other metrics we normally use to assess research impact.

Altmetrics look at the wider picture: how research is disseminated using the channels we have become accustomed to using to access and share information in every aspect of our lives. Altmetrics look at tweets, Facebook likes, how often the research is shared, is mentioned in the media (for example, the BBC website). Considering altmetrics is to consider blog posts and even Wikipedia references. There are a number of software packages that do this, one of which is Altmetric.

By using the information gathered by Altmetric, the provider has compiled a Top 100 of articles according to the altmetrics of that article. The top article is from the journal Nature and is entitled “A new antibiotic kills pathogens without detectable resistance”. This article has had 97 news stories recorded, 61 blog posts, 161 Facebook posts and an amazing 2,428 tweets. What’s really interesting about looking at this sort of information is that number 6 on this list, “Plastic pollution in the world’s oceans: more than 5 trillion plastic pieces weighing over 250,000 tons afloat at sea”, was published in an open access journal, and therefore is freely available. Although overall it has been ranked lower than the article from Nature, this particular article had seen 162 news stories and 252 Facebook posts. I can see why this article might have attracted attention: the title of it this provocative, shocking even. To me, it demonstrates the value of open access publishing: something that is clearly relevant to the world in which we live is accessible to all who want it.

The full Top 100 from Altmetric is available here.

I wonder if the impact of open access publishing will be seen to be even wider in 2016 as we head towards REF 2020. It will certainly be interesting to look at this sort of information next year!

The 12 Apps of Christmas

December 7, 2015

It’s all thanks to the University of West London for this little bit of festive fun on a Monday. Staff there who support technology enhanced learning have created The 12 Apps of Christmas. Reveal each one in turn when available to uncover a new app. Five apps have been featured so far, and I’ve just opened today’s which is Periscope, a video broadcasting app that claims it “can let you see the world through someone else’s eyes”. The aim of the app – which the creators say is about as close as you can get to teleportation! – is to ‘pick you up’ and put you somewhere you’d never normally go. Download the app, login through Twitter, and see where you get to!

Guest post: Resources for researchers

December 1, 2015

December’s guest post is brought to you by Anne Keddie, Subject Librarian for Education and Psychology, and Research Support. Here, Anne talks about a wide range of resources for researchers:

There are several ways in which we can support your use of the Library as a researcher at the University of Bolton. You will find information about sources of information, literature searching, how to organise your references, publishing your research, and how you can track the impact of your research and you can get information about how to keep up to date with research in your field.

Sources of information:

Subject-specific resources – go to the library subject pages: http://www.bolton.ac.uk/library/Subjects/Home.aspx where you will find links to resources in your subject area and contact details for the relevant subject librarian.

You can, of course, use the Discover@Bolton service accessible from the subject pages or the library home page and will allow you to search multiple databases at once via a single interface. You can access a wider range of library material, without having to know which database to use. This also searches Open Access resources including the University repository UBIR: http://ubir.bolton.ac.uk

For items not in stock, you can use our Inter Library Loan scheme: http://www.bolton.ac.uk/library/Borrowing/Inter-Library-Loans.aspx

Research Students are allowed fifteen free requests for each year registered with the University. If you wish, you can also make a personal visit to the British Library to consult material. The British Library is in London and it is best to apply for a Reader Pass and request to see specific material. Details of their services can be found at: www.bl.uk/

Current awareness – you can make use of Zetoc services which is a Journal citation searching and electronic tables of contents alerting service. It provides access to the British Library’s Electronic Table of Contents of around 20,000 current journals and around 16,000 conference proceedings published per year: http://zetoc.jisc.ac.uk/

Alerts and RSS feeds –Instead of spending time repeating searches, set up alerts to receive recently published results via email. e.g. in ProQuest you can create and schedule alerts to deliver new documents matching your search as they become available in ProQuest. Create a My Research account to modify, delete, or view all of your alerts. RSS feeds can be sourced from websites, publishers and information providers. They remove the need for you to check websites manually for new content.

Theses- EThOS is the British Library’s Electronic Theses Online Service and holds details of over 300,000 UK theses .Through their web site you can view electronic versions of some theses. For more information about the service please see:

http://ethos.bl.uk/Home.do. There is also a link from our A-Z list of electronic databases on this page: http://www.bolton.ac.uk/library/Electronic-Resources/DBPages/E.aspx

Access to other libraries- Staff and research students can use the SCONUL Access scheme to access material held in higher education institutions in the UK and Ireland. For more information see: http://www.sconul.ac.uk/sconul-access

Other library catalogues- The COPAC library catalogue provides access to the catalogues of major university, specialist, and national libraries in the UK and Ireland, including the British Library. http://copac.jisc.ac.uk/

SUNCAT is the Serials Union Catalogue for the UK research community: http://suncat.ac.uk.ezproxy.bolton.ac.uk/search

 

 

Online communities

Social Media- Social media is becoming increasingly important to researchers. For more information about some of the key tools available and how they can be used in research take a look at Social Media: A Guide to Researchers, compiled by the Research Information Network: http://www.rin.ac.uk/our-work/communicating-and-disseminating-research/social-media-guide-researchers

To make your research interests more widely known, use web pages, blogs and Twitter.

Researchgate- A network for researchers to share and collaborate with colleagues: https://www.researchgate.net/home

ORCID -Use ORCID to distinguish yourself from other researchers: http://orcid.org/

VITAE – an organisation committed to enriching professional and career development support for researchers: www.vitae.ac.uk/

Measuring your research impact – for a useful tutorial on The National Digital Teaching Resources webpages see: http://www.ndlr.ie/myri/MyRI_Tutorial/player.html

 

 

Publishing your work

If your research is published (in book format) that book needs an ISBN(International Standard Book Number). This is a unique number which distinguishes each title and where it was published. In order to give your work a University of Bolton ISBN please contact Sarah Taylor in the Library: s.e.taylor@bolton.ac.uk 01204 903099. Once you have completed a simple form, detailing the bibliographic information of that book, the ISBN can be issued.

Open access at the University of Bolton

Repositories enable your work to be visible globally. The University of Bolton Institutional Repository (UBIR) aims to gather, preserve and promote the intellectual output of the University of Bolton. It contains a wide range of research including, but not limited to, peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, internal and external conference papers, poster presentations, photographs and reports. UBIR is available at: http://ubir.bolton.ac.uk

There is much more information available via the Guide to Library Services for Researchers:

http://www.bolton.ac.uk/library/LibraryPublications/LibraryServices/GuideforResearchers.pdf

and on BISSTO including links to procedures and forms relevant to research:

http://www.bolton.ac.uk/bissto/Studying-at-University/Researchers.aspx

For more information, please contact Anne Keddie.

ICE Publishing Awards 2014: winning articles available in perpetuity

May 12, 2015

Each year, the Institute of Civil Engineers (ICE) recognises the best research published in their journals at a ceremony in London. The awards recognise excellence in research from both academia and industry; the research is deemed important enough to be of significant benefit to the entire civil engineering, and indeed science, community.

The ICE has made the winning research open access, and these papers will always be available. Read the award-winning research here.

Are we still striving to Save our Sounds?

April 2, 2015

Back in January, I wrote about a new British Library initiative aiming to save recorded sounds: it has been estimated that by 2030 (only 15 years away, even though it sounds like it’s much further into the future!) many of the UK’s recorded sounds will be inaccessible, due to both the degradation of the material, and the fact that the equipment needed to listen to such sounds is likely to become obsolete. Following a call from the British Library, details of over 800,000 items have been collated, all of which will contribute to the British Library’s UK Sound Directory. To find out more about this fascinating – and, indeed, vital – project, take a look at the Save our Sounds project website.

New website for JORUM

March 23, 2015

JORUM, the repository for Online Educational Resources (OER) has recently launched a new website, which is available now. To find out more about the new website, take a look at the JORUM blog, and have a look at the new JORUM website for yourself!

Finding and accessing data in the UK Data Service: webinar, March 10th

February 23, 2015

If you are interested in knowing more about accessing social science data and related resources from the UK Data Service, you may be interested to know about a free webinar that is scheduled to take place on Tuesday 10th March at 3 p.m. The information from the UK Data Service is as follows:

 

Webinar: Finding and accessing data in the UK Data Service

10 March 2015

Online at 3 pm

This webinar is intended for anyone who wants to know more about finding data from the UK Data Service. Participants will be given a practical overview, focusing on the Service’s search-and-browse portal – Discover – which allows users to find datasets, variables, qualitative extracts, support guides, case studies, ESRC outputs, and more. Hints and tips on how to get the best out of Discover will be provided, as well as an overview of the portal’s growing content.

The webinar will consist of a 30 minute presentation followed by 20 minutes for questions.

Booking is free; please sign up here:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7895288797047013122

 

EThOS Share My Thesis competition

January 29, 2015

If you are a PhD author or current doctoral student, then take a look at the following message from the British Library:

“The British Library is currently running a Twitter based competition for all PhD authors and current doctoral students, inviting them to say why their doctoral research is/was important, using the hashtag #ShareMyThesis.

 Twitter competition:

https://twitter.com/search?f=realtime&q=%23sharemythesis&src=typd

Competition web page:

http://www.bl.uk/share-my-thesis/

 

The competition aims to raise awareness of the importance of doctoral research and increase visibility of the PhD thesis as a valuable source of research information. It is generously supported by Research Councils UK and Vitae, and there are some great prizes.

 

The range and quality of doctoral research being tweeted in 140 characters is truly amazing. Entries are flooding in already, and you can see them all here https://twitter.com/search?f=realtime&q=%23sharemythesis&src=typd.

 

The competition closes on 9 February, when eight entries will be shortlisted and invited to expand their tweet into a blog post.”

 

Happy sharing!