Archive for the ‘UBIR’ Category

Guest post: Resources for researchers

December 1, 2015

December’s guest post is brought to you by Anne Keddie, Subject Librarian for Education and Psychology, and Research Support. Here, Anne talks about a wide range of resources for researchers:

There are several ways in which we can support your use of the Library as a researcher at the University of Bolton. You will find information about sources of information, literature searching, how to organise your references, publishing your research, and how you can track the impact of your research and you can get information about how to keep up to date with research in your field.

Sources of information:

Subject-specific resources – go to the library subject pages: http://www.bolton.ac.uk/library/Subjects/Home.aspx where you will find links to resources in your subject area and contact details for the relevant subject librarian.

You can, of course, use the Discover@Bolton service accessible from the subject pages or the library home page and will allow you to search multiple databases at once via a single interface. You can access a wider range of library material, without having to know which database to use. This also searches Open Access resources including the University repository UBIR: http://ubir.bolton.ac.uk

For items not in stock, you can use our Inter Library Loan scheme: http://www.bolton.ac.uk/library/Borrowing/Inter-Library-Loans.aspx

Research Students are allowed fifteen free requests for each year registered with the University. If you wish, you can also make a personal visit to the British Library to consult material. The British Library is in London and it is best to apply for a Reader Pass and request to see specific material. Details of their services can be found at: www.bl.uk/

Current awareness – you can make use of Zetoc services which is a Journal citation searching and electronic tables of contents alerting service. It provides access to the British Library’s Electronic Table of Contents of around 20,000 current journals and around 16,000 conference proceedings published per year: http://zetoc.jisc.ac.uk/

Alerts and RSS feeds –Instead of spending time repeating searches, set up alerts to receive recently published results via email. e.g. in ProQuest you can create and schedule alerts to deliver new documents matching your search as they become available in ProQuest. Create a My Research account to modify, delete, or view all of your alerts. RSS feeds can be sourced from websites, publishers and information providers. They remove the need for you to check websites manually for new content.

Theses- EThOS is the British Library’s Electronic Theses Online Service and holds details of over 300,000 UK theses .Through their web site you can view electronic versions of some theses. For more information about the service please see:

http://ethos.bl.uk/Home.do. There is also a link from our A-Z list of electronic databases on this page: http://www.bolton.ac.uk/library/Electronic-Resources/DBPages/E.aspx

Access to other libraries- Staff and research students can use the SCONUL Access scheme to access material held in higher education institutions in the UK and Ireland. For more information see: http://www.sconul.ac.uk/sconul-access

Other library catalogues- The COPAC library catalogue provides access to the catalogues of major university, specialist, and national libraries in the UK and Ireland, including the British Library. http://copac.jisc.ac.uk/

SUNCAT is the Serials Union Catalogue for the UK research community: http://suncat.ac.uk.ezproxy.bolton.ac.uk/search

 

 

Online communities

Social Media- Social media is becoming increasingly important to researchers. For more information about some of the key tools available and how they can be used in research take a look at Social Media: A Guide to Researchers, compiled by the Research Information Network: http://www.rin.ac.uk/our-work/communicating-and-disseminating-research/social-media-guide-researchers

To make your research interests more widely known, use web pages, blogs and Twitter.

Researchgate- A network for researchers to share and collaborate with colleagues: https://www.researchgate.net/home

ORCID -Use ORCID to distinguish yourself from other researchers: http://orcid.org/

VITAE – an organisation committed to enriching professional and career development support for researchers: www.vitae.ac.uk/

Measuring your research impact – for a useful tutorial on The National Digital Teaching Resources webpages see: http://www.ndlr.ie/myri/MyRI_Tutorial/player.html

 

 

Publishing your work

If your research is published (in book format) that book needs an ISBN(International Standard Book Number). This is a unique number which distinguishes each title and where it was published. In order to give your work a University of Bolton ISBN please contact Sarah Taylor in the Library: s.e.taylor@bolton.ac.uk 01204 903099. Once you have completed a simple form, detailing the bibliographic information of that book, the ISBN can be issued.

Open access at the University of Bolton

Repositories enable your work to be visible globally. The University of Bolton Institutional Repository (UBIR) aims to gather, preserve and promote the intellectual output of the University of Bolton. It contains a wide range of research including, but not limited to, peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, internal and external conference papers, poster presentations, photographs and reports. UBIR is available at: http://ubir.bolton.ac.uk

There is much more information available via the Guide to Library Services for Researchers:

http://www.bolton.ac.uk/library/LibraryPublications/LibraryServices/GuideforResearchers.pdf

and on BISSTO including links to procedures and forms relevant to research:

http://www.bolton.ac.uk/bissto/Studying-at-University/Researchers.aspx

For more information, please contact Anne Keddie.

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It’s Open Access Week!

October 20, 2015

This week is International Open Access Week, a global, annual event that is now in its eight year. It’s a chance for the higher education community to share knowledge, best practice, concerns and development in open access as well as encourage open access to become an accepted norm of scholarly communication. I can’t really define open access any better than the organisers of Open Access Week, so if you are still in any doubt as to what open access is, this definition sums it perfectly:

“Open Access” to information – the free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research, and the right to use and re-use those results as you need – has the power to transform the way research and scientific inquiry are conducted. It has direct and widespread implications for academia, medicine, science, industry, and for society as a whole.

Open Access (OA) has the potential to maximize research investments, increase the exposure and use of published research, facilitate the ability to conduct research across available literature, and enhance the overall advancement of scholarship. Research funding agencies, academic institutions, researchers and scientists, teachers, students, and members of the general public are supporting a move towards Open Access in increasing numbers every year.

The website for International Open Access Week contains a lot of very interesting information, so take a look and what’s going on.

If you want to follow the debates across the globe, the best way to do this is to follow #openaccessweek on Twitter. Currently being discussed are avoiding pitfalls of open access, how Harvard University wishes to ensure that information about climate change is made open access, the topics being covered in an open access talk given by HEFCE in Washington, special offers from publishers, how technology can help with open access and what libraries are doing to ensure that submissions for REF2020 can be made open access.

So what about open access here at the University of Bolton? We have UBIR, which will be the primary means by which authors can ensure that any research that is be submitted to the REF is made open access. And remember, if you are wanting to submit your research for the REF it has to be made open access. Quite aside from REF preparations, making our research available via an open access platform such as UBIR brings research to a much wider audience, and can only help to develop its impact.

And UBIR is back!

October 12, 2015

No sooner had I told you that UBIR was down and back it came!

UBIR currently unavailable

October 12, 2015

UBIR is currently unavailable. The problem has been reported and it is hoped will be resolved as soon as possible.

Did you present at the TIRI Conference? Make your presentations open access by depositing in UBIR!

August 18, 2015

Did you present at the hugely successful University of Bolton TIRI Conference back in July? If so, why not have your presentations deposited in UBIR, the University of Bolton Institutional Repository. Depositing in UBIR will increase discoverability – and readership – of your research. To deposit your presentation in UBIR, simply send it in electronic format to ubir@bolton.ac.uk and the UBIR Team will do the rest.

Guide to open access monograph publishing for arts, humanities and social science researchers now available

August 17, 2015

OAPEN-UK, a project funded by JISC and the AHRC that has been set up to investigate the issues surrounding the publication and availability of monographs and to provide a roadmap for the future of this type of publication, has created a guide to open access monograph publishing for arts, humanities and social sciences researchers. The guide is available to download here.

  • The aims of OAPEN-UK, which is linked with the European OAPEN project, are as follows:

  • undertake a real time pilot with HSS scholarly monograph titles

  • establish what challenges each stakeholder faces in the open access scholarly monograph environment

  • gather and evaluate a wide range of data to explore the challenges and how they might be addressed

  • analyse usage and sales data with publishers to help ascertain what an open access business model might look like

  • assess the attitudes and perceptions of the authors, researchers, publishers and readers to open access scholarly monographs

  • explore the route of funding and the systems and processes required to support this

  • develop recommendations to aid the discovery of open access scholarly monographs

  • promote awareness of the issues and challenges of open access monographs

  • share the results of OAPEN-UK and disseminate the findings at an international level

From: http://oapen-uk.jiscebooks.org/overview/

The publication of open access books presents a number of challenges, and it is hoped that the outcomes of the OAPEN-UK project will go a long way to address these challenges.

The good news is that achieving open access for journal articles is a little simpler, and here at the University of Bolton journal articles, conference papers and reports can be made open access by depositing the work in UBIR. Research in UBIR is open access and discoverable both via search engines such as Google, Google Scholar and the Library’s new Discover@Bolton service. Many publishers allow the deposit of full-text research in repositories. Moreover, any research that it to be submitted for REF2020 must be made open access: deposit in UBIR will fulfil this requirement, which has been set by HEFCE. For further information, contact the UBIR Team.

UBIR is back now!

July 13, 2015

UBIR is available again and can be accessed as normal.

Important notice for those using Wiley journals (and UBIR is still down…!)

July 13, 2015

If you make use of the journals available on the Wiley platform, be aware that if in any one session you attempt to download more than 25 articles, you may presented with a CAPTCHA screen and asked to enter the code you see. You may well have come across this before, and once you have entered the code, you will be able to proceed as normal to download the article.

In other news, UBIR is still unavailable, but we’re hoping this issue will be resolved as soon as possible.

Taylor and Francis working as normal and UBIR down again

July 9, 2015

The problems we were experiencing with Taylor and Francis last week have been resolved. The not so good news is that UBIR is down again. This has been reported and it is hoped the problem will be resolved as soon as possible.

UBIR available again

June 1, 2015

Some good news to start the month of June: UBIR is up and running again.