Archive for the ‘Subject resources’ Category

Updated A to Z list of databases now available

November 7, 2016

As part of the work we are doing to make accessing information about electronic resources easier, we’ve been working on the A to Z list of databases, and there have been some changes. The list of databases is still accessible from exactly the same place – the quick link on the right-hand side of the library pages – but looks a little different:

az-list-new-7-11-16

Don’t worry, however: all the databases are still there! Browse by database title or subject or search for term; you’ll also be able to learn about new resources, or resources we are currently considering. Contact details are also available, as is the Electronic Resources blog to keep to you up to date.

 

Problems with Discover@Bolton

October 13, 2016

We seem to be having a few problems accessing Discover@Bolton at the moment. We are working to resolve the problem and aim to rectify it as soon as possible. In the meantime, our electronic resources are still working. If you are unsure of which the best resources for your subject are, take a look at the relevant Subject Guide and head to the Databases, journals and articles section.

New: Subject Guides

September 16, 2016

Yesterday I mentioned a development that we have been working on over the summer to make it easier for you to access information on subject-specific resources. Those of you who are used to using our pages to access subject-specific information may have spotted that the Resources by Subject link that on the library web pages has changed to Subject Guides.

Follow the link and you will see a list of Subject Guides, one for each course area, and each containing information about accessing our services, links to relevant databases, useful websites, library publications that may be of use and more besides. We recognised that some of you found it difficult to access the information you need to undertake your studies, so we hope that our new list of Subject Guides will be helpful. Each Subject Guide also includes contact details of your Subject Librarian.

If you ever need any help with accessing resources, don’t hesitate to get in touch!

Highlighting games and special effects resources

February 26, 2016

If you’ve walked through the library this week, you may have noticed that our current display is all about resources for games and specials effects: many books on the topic have been included in this display.

You may be interested to know, therefore, that we also have access to a number of electronic resources that may be of benefit to those studying in this area. Two particular resources spring to mind: IEEE Xplore and Art Full Text. IEEE Xplore brings full-text journal articles covering a range of computing-related topics including material on special effects and games, such as creating virtual environments, portraying specific weather conditions and simulation. Art Full Text (available via Discover@Bolton as well as via the library website) is a major art resource and a search on “special effects” brings me articles on a variety of related topics including the development of special effects through the 1970s and 80s relating to Star Wars, further articles on simulation and even digital cinematography.

As you may also expect, a number of University of Bolton academics have published on these types of topics – including understanding the Uncanny Valley – and these are accessible from UBIR. Have a look here for University of Bolton research in that area.

Lastly, don’t forget about Discover@Bolton, which will provide you with relevant results from a range of databases.

A look back at 2015 (and welcome back to UBIR!)

January 4, 2016

The problems we were having with UBIR this morning have been resolved thanks to the swift actions of our Networks team and the service is working as normal.

Every year, I like to look back on the previous year, so now that we appear to be without resource problems, it’s time to do just that for 2015. However, before I do, over Christmas I was watching one of these ‘review of the year’ type programmes. I happened to catch the closing credits, and one of the sources mentioned was WGSN – Worth Global Style Network – which is a resource that we have access to here at the University of Bolton. Among other areas, WGSN looks at current and predicted trends, and is proof that our resources are essential for understanding a topic. Access WGSN via the library webpages or via Discover@Bolton.

Anyway, I digress. Back to 2015.

Last year was an exciting year for me as Electronic Resources Librarian as a number of very important changes were made to make your experience of accessing and discovering electronic resources better. We’ll come to these changes later.

In January, we had a fair few resource problems (staggeringly, my first post of 2015 concerned UBIR outage!) which were a cause of frustration. I think that was possibly one of the worst months I’ve known for that. However, we also looked at the British Library’s Save our Sounds project which is looking to negate the very real issue that in just 15 years, many recorded sounds could be inaccessible as equipment required to preserve and play them becomes obsolete. February was an exciting month: Discover@Bolton search boxes appeared on the library website. Although at that stage Discover@Bolton was only accessible on-campus, this was the first time that a service to search multiple databases at once was made readily available to the University of Bolton community. March saw a solar eclipse, and we looked at how we could use our electronic databases to find out more about this phenomenon.

April was a quiet month, so we reviewed Save our Sounds and pointed readers in the direction of JISC’s Summer of Innovation. May saw a General Election and as well as a new government, we also acquired two new resources: WGSN Lifestyle and Interiors and the online edition of the British Medical Journal. As the academic year drew to a close, June seemed to be a busy month for resource problems, including one of the most bizarre remote access I’ve ever come across in 10 years of working with electronic resources.

July was another quiet month, not least because of major refurbishment works that were taking place in the Library over the summer. As we all looked forward to a break, I considered the merits of speaking to publishes about resource usage and development, and how it is important to engage with them. July was also when I presented Discover@Bolton to staff at the University’s TIRI Conference, and how it could be used to enhance learning. My presentation is available here. As the summer drew on, in August we looked at OAPEN-UK, a project set to investigate issues surrounding the publication of textbooks in electronic format.

All this time, I was working on two important developments that  came to fruition in September. The first of these was a major change – in the background – to how we log into resources. This change was particularly important for remote access and we really hope things are simpler now. The other change, and the one I’m most excited about, was the off-campus launch of Discover@Bolton. That was pretty much the only news that month, but it was certainly big news! In October, we acquired yet another new resource: Acland Anatomy. We also looked at open access as part of Open Access Week and we had the first of our Subject Librarian guest posts: Reading Lists online by Mary Barden. November saw an exploration of Royal College of Nursing Journals by our Subject Librarian for Health Dawn Grundy, extra content was added to Discover@Bolton and we remembered George Boole, whose development of logic led to the use of AND, OR and NOT that we have come to use in our own library searches.

As the year drew to a close, December brought another Subject Librarian guest post, this time on services for researchers by Anne Keddie. We looked at the top 100 articles of 2015 according to Altmetric, and we had a bit of fun looking at the 12 Apps of Christmas.

So that was 2015. I wonder what 2016 will bring…

 

Guest post: Resources for researchers

December 1, 2015

December’s guest post is brought to you by Anne Keddie, Subject Librarian for Education and Psychology, and Research Support. Here, Anne talks about a wide range of resources for researchers:

There are several ways in which we can support your use of the Library as a researcher at the University of Bolton. You will find information about sources of information, literature searching, how to organise your references, publishing your research, and how you can track the impact of your research and you can get information about how to keep up to date with research in your field.

Sources of information:

Subject-specific resources – go to the library subject pages: http://www.bolton.ac.uk/library/Subjects/Home.aspx where you will find links to resources in your subject area and contact details for the relevant subject librarian.

You can, of course, use the Discover@Bolton service accessible from the subject pages or the library home page and will allow you to search multiple databases at once via a single interface. You can access a wider range of library material, without having to know which database to use. This also searches Open Access resources including the University repository UBIR: http://ubir.bolton.ac.uk

For items not in stock, you can use our Inter Library Loan scheme: http://www.bolton.ac.uk/library/Borrowing/Inter-Library-Loans.aspx

Research Students are allowed fifteen free requests for each year registered with the University. If you wish, you can also make a personal visit to the British Library to consult material. The British Library is in London and it is best to apply for a Reader Pass and request to see specific material. Details of their services can be found at: www.bl.uk/

Current awareness – you can make use of Zetoc services which is a Journal citation searching and electronic tables of contents alerting service. It provides access to the British Library’s Electronic Table of Contents of around 20,000 current journals and around 16,000 conference proceedings published per year: http://zetoc.jisc.ac.uk/

Alerts and RSS feeds –Instead of spending time repeating searches, set up alerts to receive recently published results via email. e.g. in ProQuest you can create and schedule alerts to deliver new documents matching your search as they become available in ProQuest. Create a My Research account to modify, delete, or view all of your alerts. RSS feeds can be sourced from websites, publishers and information providers. They remove the need for you to check websites manually for new content.

Theses- EThOS is the British Library’s Electronic Theses Online Service and holds details of over 300,000 UK theses .Through their web site you can view electronic versions of some theses. For more information about the service please see:

http://ethos.bl.uk/Home.do. There is also a link from our A-Z list of electronic databases on this page: http://www.bolton.ac.uk/library/Electronic-Resources/DBPages/E.aspx

Access to other libraries- Staff and research students can use the SCONUL Access scheme to access material held in higher education institutions in the UK and Ireland. For more information see: http://www.sconul.ac.uk/sconul-access

Other library catalogues- The COPAC library catalogue provides access to the catalogues of major university, specialist, and national libraries in the UK and Ireland, including the British Library. http://copac.jisc.ac.uk/

SUNCAT is the Serials Union Catalogue for the UK research community: http://suncat.ac.uk.ezproxy.bolton.ac.uk/search

 

 

Online communities

Social Media- Social media is becoming increasingly important to researchers. For more information about some of the key tools available and how they can be used in research take a look at Social Media: A Guide to Researchers, compiled by the Research Information Network: http://www.rin.ac.uk/our-work/communicating-and-disseminating-research/social-media-guide-researchers

To make your research interests more widely known, use web pages, blogs and Twitter.

Researchgate- A network for researchers to share and collaborate with colleagues: https://www.researchgate.net/home

ORCID -Use ORCID to distinguish yourself from other researchers: http://orcid.org/

VITAE – an organisation committed to enriching professional and career development support for researchers: www.vitae.ac.uk/

Measuring your research impact – for a useful tutorial on The National Digital Teaching Resources webpages see: http://www.ndlr.ie/myri/MyRI_Tutorial/player.html

 

 

Publishing your work

If your research is published (in book format) that book needs an ISBN(International Standard Book Number). This is a unique number which distinguishes each title and where it was published. In order to give your work a University of Bolton ISBN please contact Sarah Taylor in the Library: s.e.taylor@bolton.ac.uk 01204 903099. Once you have completed a simple form, detailing the bibliographic information of that book, the ISBN can be issued.

Open access at the University of Bolton

Repositories enable your work to be visible globally. The University of Bolton Institutional Repository (UBIR) aims to gather, preserve and promote the intellectual output of the University of Bolton. It contains a wide range of research including, but not limited to, peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, internal and external conference papers, poster presentations, photographs and reports. UBIR is available at: http://ubir.bolton.ac.uk

There is much more information available via the Guide to Library Services for Researchers:

http://www.bolton.ac.uk/library/LibraryPublications/LibraryServices/GuideforResearchers.pdf

and on BISSTO including links to procedures and forms relevant to research:

http://www.bolton.ac.uk/bissto/Studying-at-University/Researchers.aspx

For more information, please contact Anne Keddie.

New! WGSN Lifestyle and Interiors now available

May 19, 2015

We’re definitely on a good news roll today! We have recently purchased WGSN Lifestyle and Interiors (formerly known as WGSN Homebuildlife). A leading trend forecasting services, WGSN Lifestyle and Interiors focusses on the home and interiors industries and covers a huge range of areas, including outdoors and garden, print and patterns, textiles, vintage, crafts, marketing, retail and kitchens to name a few. WGSN Lifestyle and Interiors can be accessed from the A to Z list of databases on the library website. Note that at present, this service is only available on-campus.

Enjoy!

Off to the polls we go!

May 7, 2015

In case it’s escaped you completely, throughout the nation people are voting in the UK General Election. Want to know more about British politics? We have a wide range of electronic resources that will present almost any view imaginable, from historical politics to the policies of our current and would-be politicians. Not sure which resources would be best to use? Try Discover@Bolton, and see what you get!

Finding and accessing data in the UK Data Service: webinar, March 10th

February 23, 2015

If you are interested in knowing more about accessing social science data and related resources from the UK Data Service, you may be interested to know about a free webinar that is scheduled to take place on Tuesday 10th March at 3 p.m. The information from the UK Data Service is as follows:

 

Webinar: Finding and accessing data in the UK Data Service

10 March 2015

Online at 3 pm

This webinar is intended for anyone who wants to know more about finding data from the UK Data Service. Participants will be given a practical overview, focusing on the Service’s search-and-browse portal – Discover – which allows users to find datasets, variables, qualitative extracts, support guides, case studies, ESRC outputs, and more. Hints and tips on how to get the best out of Discover will be provided, as well as an overview of the portal’s growing content.

The webinar will consist of a 30 minute presentation followed by 20 minutes for questions.

Booking is free; please sign up here:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7895288797047013122

 

Sharing Ebola research with the wider scientific community

August 26, 2014

As the fight against Ebola continues, AAAS Science and Science Translational Medicine journals have made all research on Ebola available for free for the benefit of the wider scientific research community. In a statement, AAAS say “given the current outbreak, unprecedented in terms of the number of people killed and rapid geographic spread, Science and Science Translational Medicine have made this collection of research and news articles on the viral disease, Ebola, freely available to researchers and to the general public.” The papers are available here.