Archive for the ‘Reading Lists Online’ Category

New! Links to Reading Lists Online and Subject Guides are now on the Student Portal

October 10, 2017

student portal

It is now possible to link to both Reading Lists Online AND Subject Guides from the Student Portal; look for the two icons above.

This seems like a good opportunity to talk about both of these services. Let’s take Reading Lists Online first of all. Reading Lists Online is exactly “what is says on the tin” (no apologies for the cliché there…!): reading lists, that are online. What’s the benefit of this? Quite aside from the fact that your reading lists are absolutely essential to your studies, an online reading list ensures that you can access your list wherever you are, and you can even link to online material from that list. Not only can you link to electronic books and journals, you can also find links to services such as Discover@Bolton, your Subject Guide and even important websites. Simply search for your module code and your list will be accessible. We are working on integrating Reading Lists Online in Moodle so this process will hopefully be simpler – watch this space!

So to Subject Guides. One of the questions we get quite regularly is “Where do I start?”, and actually, that’s a really good question: where should you start?! An excellent starting point is the Subject Guide for your course. Use the guide to access information about access resources, explanations and links to the best electronic resources for your studies, links to referencing, using the Library, accessing Inter-Library Loans and access to Discover@Bolton.

 

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Issues with personal Reading Lists Online accounts

January 24, 2017

We are having a few problems with person Reading Lists Online (RLO) accounts this morning; normal usage is not affected. This is due to technical changes to the way in which we login to RLO and we are working to resolve it as quickly as possible.

What’s wrong with my resource…?!

November 21, 2016

The Internet is a funny thing. When everything is working fine – which is most of the time, mercifully – we don’t even think twice about clicking on a link and getting to where we want to go. When things aren’t working quite as expected, it’s like we’re a little stuck. Perhaps we’re stuck in a loop; perhaps we’re repeatedly coming across broken links. Maybe we long for the days of the card catalogue…

As Electronic Resources Librarian, I’m clearly a champion of the electronic resource. My own research activities – and as a consequence by personal and professional development – have been enhanced by having ready access to electronic resources. I am constantly amazed by new developments. It isn’t always seamless, however, and our reliance on Internet connections and working devices to access electronic resources can sometimes backfire, for want of a better word: if one or the other goes, what do we do?!

So, this morning we have a problem with RLO. It would seem that we are experiencing issues with the display of links to RLO from with our library catalogue. However, it would seem at the moment that this problem is restricted to Internet Explorer. Everything seems to be working fine in Chrome, so my suggestion would be to switch to using Chrome, if available, or perhaps try another browser (Firefox, Safari etc.). I am finding more and more that resources are working better in Chrome. Exactly why that is I really do not know, but if you are having any issues with accessing electronic resources, or they are not working the way you expect them to be – perhaps the display is strange, or everything is  being very slow to load – then have a go in Chrome.

In the meantime, because we fully appreciate that many of you prefer to use Internet Explorer, we are working to resolve the display issues we are seeing in RLO, and apologies for any inconvenience caused.

Watch this space for further updates.

 

New! Guide to Reading Lists Online

November 17, 2016

We’ve been hard at work recently and have just launched a new guide to Reading Lists Online , which you can access here.

rlo-guide

If you don’t know about Reading Lists Online, it’s definitely worth checking this service out, as RLO enables access to your module reading lists. Last year this blog featured a guest post on RLO – check this out, too!

Looking for the link to Reading Lists Online in Moodle? Look for further!

September 27, 2016

If you’re wondering where the link to Reading Lists Online from Moodle has gone, it is now accessible from the Study Resources menu you’ll see once you have logged in:

rlo-in-moodle

Simply click on the Reading Lists Online option and search for your lists.

Reading Lists Online: a refresher

February 23, 2016

The thing about being an Electronic Resources Librarian is that you find yourself learning all sorts of things about all sort of electronic resources. As far as I’m concerned, the more I know the better! So this week, I’ve been learning a little more about a great service we offer called Reading Lists Online. Reading Lists Online does pretty much exactly as it says on the tin (link?!): reading lists that are online. You’ll find links to Reading Lists Online on the library website and also on Moodle.

Back in October, our Subject Librarian Guest Post covered Reading Lists Online, and as the author, Mary Barden, can express it better, here’s what she had to say about this essential service:

Did you know that you can access your module reading lists online? You should see a reading list block in your Moodle courses or alternatively, you can access your lists via the Reading Lists Online link on the Library website Quick Links menu. Search for your module code or title and you will see your module list. Click on a book title to find where it is located in the Library. But the real advantage of RLO is that you can access e-resources such as ebooks, ejournals and databases direct from the list. Click on Online Resource, login and go direct into the resource.

For further information have a look at the user guide and screen cast video, speak to staff at the Help Desk in the Library or email subjecthelp@bolton.ac.uk.

 

A look back at 2015 (and welcome back to UBIR!)

January 4, 2016

The problems we were having with UBIR this morning have been resolved thanks to the swift actions of our Networks team and the service is working as normal.

Every year, I like to look back on the previous year, so now that we appear to be without resource problems, it’s time to do just that for 2015. However, before I do, over Christmas I was watching one of these ‘review of the year’ type programmes. I happened to catch the closing credits, and one of the sources mentioned was WGSN – Worth Global Style Network – which is a resource that we have access to here at the University of Bolton. Among other areas, WGSN looks at current and predicted trends, and is proof that our resources are essential for understanding a topic. Access WGSN via the library webpages or via Discover@Bolton.

Anyway, I digress. Back to 2015.

Last year was an exciting year for me as Electronic Resources Librarian as a number of very important changes were made to make your experience of accessing and discovering electronic resources better. We’ll come to these changes later.

In January, we had a fair few resource problems (staggeringly, my first post of 2015 concerned UBIR outage!) which were a cause of frustration. I think that was possibly one of the worst months I’ve known for that. However, we also looked at the British Library’s Save our Sounds project which is looking to negate the very real issue that in just 15 years, many recorded sounds could be inaccessible as equipment required to preserve and play them becomes obsolete. February was an exciting month: Discover@Bolton search boxes appeared on the library website. Although at that stage Discover@Bolton was only accessible on-campus, this was the first time that a service to search multiple databases at once was made readily available to the University of Bolton community. March saw a solar eclipse, and we looked at how we could use our electronic databases to find out more about this phenomenon.

April was a quiet month, so we reviewed Save our Sounds and pointed readers in the direction of JISC’s Summer of Innovation. May saw a General Election and as well as a new government, we also acquired two new resources: WGSN Lifestyle and Interiors and the online edition of the British Medical Journal. As the academic year drew to a close, June seemed to be a busy month for resource problems, including one of the most bizarre remote access I’ve ever come across in 10 years of working with electronic resources.

July was another quiet month, not least because of major refurbishment works that were taking place in the Library over the summer. As we all looked forward to a break, I considered the merits of speaking to publishes about resource usage and development, and how it is important to engage with them. July was also when I presented Discover@Bolton to staff at the University’s TIRI Conference, and how it could be used to enhance learning. My presentation is available here. As the summer drew on, in August we looked at OAPEN-UK, a project set to investigate issues surrounding the publication of textbooks in electronic format.

All this time, I was working on two important developments that  came to fruition in September. The first of these was a major change – in the background – to how we log into resources. This change was particularly important for remote access and we really hope things are simpler now. The other change, and the one I’m most excited about, was the off-campus launch of Discover@Bolton. That was pretty much the only news that month, but it was certainly big news! In October, we acquired yet another new resource: Acland Anatomy. We also looked at open access as part of Open Access Week and we had the first of our Subject Librarian guest posts: Reading Lists online by Mary Barden. November saw an exploration of Royal College of Nursing Journals by our Subject Librarian for Health Dawn Grundy, extra content was added to Discover@Bolton and we remembered George Boole, whose development of logic led to the use of AND, OR and NOT that we have come to use in our own library searches.

As the year drew to a close, December brought another Subject Librarian guest post, this time on services for researchers by Anne Keddie. We looked at the top 100 articles of 2015 according to Altmetric, and we had a bit of fun looking at the 12 Apps of Christmas.

So that was 2015. I wonder what 2016 will bring…

 

Guest post: Reading Lists Online – quick access to your e-resources!

October 5, 2015

As mentioned a few weeks ago, new for this blog this term is a series of guest posts written by our team of Subject Librarians to highlight various services and resources. The first in this series has been written by Mary Barden, Subject Librarian for Business, Accountancy and Law. Here, Mary writes about Reading Lists Online, an important service that will make it much easier for you to access material recommended by your tutors:

Did you know that you can access your module reading lists online? You should see a reading list block in your Moodle courses or alternatively, you can access your lists via the Reading Lists Online link on the Library website Quick Links menu. Search for your module code or title and you will see your module list. Click on a book title to find where it is located in the Library. But the real advantage of RLO is that you can access e-resources such as ebooks, ejournals and databases direct from the list. Click on Online Resource, login and go direct into the resource.

For further information have a look at the user guide and screen cast video, speak to staff at the Help Desk in the Library or email subjecthelp@bolton.ac.uk.