Archive for the ‘Electronic journals’ Category

Back home with OUP Journals

February 21, 2017

The – frankly bizarre – problem we were having with OUP thinking we were in Estonia, and not the University of Bolton, as been resolved.

Hopefully no more e-resources tourism now…!

If you are trying to access articles from ScienceDirect, read on

February 21, 2017

It looks like we are still experiencing problems accessing articles from ScienceDirect via Discover@Bolton. However, it would appear that this problem is limited to accessing articles in this manner: ‘direct’ access to ScienceDirect articles (i.e. from the platform itself) appears to be working as normal.

ScienceDirect can be accessed from the A to Z list of resources.

I’m told that the providers of ScienceDirect will be releasing an update at some point today which will fix the issues we have been having. Apologies for the inconvenience: everyone who is trying to access ScienceDirect is experiencing the same problem.

Wiley Online Library seems to be working again

February 17, 2017

It looks like Wiley Online Library is working as it should now and you should be able to read and download journal articles to which we have access again. As ever, if you do have any issues accessing journal articles, don’t hesitate to contact Subject Help.

Yet another problematic resource: Wiley journals

February 13, 2017

So far I am not a fan of this week. As well as everything else, we appear to be having problems with Wiley journals at the moment, specifically the Journal of Advanced Nursing. We are working with the publisher to resolve the issue as soon as we can and hope to restore normal access as soon as possible.

 

A case of mistaken identity…?

February 13, 2017

Well this is a new one for me. We are experiencing problems linking to OUP Journals at the moment, with an error message appearing. I had thought that I managed to resolve this issue, but it would seem that the OUP Journals platform thinks I’m not at the University of Bolton, but at the University of Tartu. Which if you are curious (and I was…) is in Estonia. We’re working on it, and hope to restore mention of our true location as soon as possible!

Problems with Taylor and Francis journals

February 7, 2017

We are experiencing problems with Taylor and Francis journals at the moment. This problem is affecting all Taylor and Francis customers and will hopefully be resolved as soon as possible.

Changes to the Emerald journals interface

January 9, 2017

Over the festive break, publishers Emerald have been busy rebranding. Their website looks a little different, and their logo is different. The swirly ‘e’ has been replaced by something a little more modern-looking. Rest assured, however, that access to content remains the same and access to the database itself has not been affected.

I must admit I’m quite sad to see the swirly ‘e’ go. I’m not normally one for sticking to what I’ve always known (although Starbursts to me will always be Opal Fruits), but I feel quite nostalgic about that old green ‘e’. I couldn’t quite figure out why until I cast my mind back a few years and recollected that Emerald was one of the first electronic databases that provided access to full text content that I used as a student. Prior to studying Library and Information Management, there was very little in the way of electronic resources that was of any relevance whatsoever to me as a musicology student. The odd CD-ROM, perhaps, and I was fully au fait with your average microfilm reader, but electronic resources that provided full text were a bit of an unknown.

Emerald was the first database providing full text access to journal articles that I got to really learn. It was a wonderful revelation: truly, it was as if I’d completed a Moon landing, such was my amazement. It still remains a most useful database, and although I’ve got beyond that Eureka moment of being able to download an article, I still wonder slightly at the availability of research following just a few keystrokes.

 

Farewell 2016…

December 20, 2016

This Electronic Resources Librarian will be finishing for Christmas in a matter of hours, and so it’s reached the point in the year where we look back at the past 12 months. Before I do, I’ll take this opportunity to remind you that our electronic resources will be available wherever you are over the festive break.

Anyway, to 2016.

The year seemed to start with lots of reports of broken resources: blog posts from January are somewhat singular in nature. However, a report about the Scopus Cited Reference Programme provided an opportunity to reflect on the growth in online information provision, and just how much this has changed in the past 20 years. I reminisced about the overhead projectors. It was possibly a slow month… In February, I looked at usage statistics, and how, or even if, we can determine what our most popular electronic resource is, we reminded ourselves of our Reading Lists Online Service (more on that in 2017) and finally I was able to bring the exciting – or it is in my world – news that we are able to access usage statistics for UBIR. March was another quiet month on the electronic resources front – not even an overhead projector made and appearance – I talked a little about open access compliancy for the REF.

As the year went on, this blog was a little quiet. It seemed that access problems were not as prevalent as they had been at the start of the year, and everything was ticking over rather nicely. However, there was another reason why this blog was a little more quiet than usual: behind the scenes some very exciting work was being done to improve the way in which we provide information about our resources and subject-specific support. The comparative quiet of April, May, June and July ended in August with what has become a annual summer event: redesigned resources. Some annual events I like; some I do not. Resource redesigns often fall into the latter category. However, one of the resources subject to a redesign this summer was the Taylor and Francis platform, and this particular redesign has been rather good. Indeed, usage of the resource has gone up, so it seems that you all like it, too.

And so to September, and the start of the new academic year. To coincide with the new academic year, we launched Subject Guides, which are subject-specific pages that provide access to information relating to your course, for example, links to resources and study skills information. Related to this, we launched a new guide for Research Support in October for anyone who is engaged in any research at any level. November saw some further developments in how we present information about resources as we launched a new and improved A to Z list of databases, a guide to Reading Lists Online and a completely new Electronic Resources page on the Library website. Also this term the Library Twitter feed (@BoltonUniLib) has featured E-resources top tips: bite-sized helpful information about resources. We’ve also been fortunate this term to subscribe to two new resources: Drama Online and ProQuest Ebook Central, the latter of which enables access to around 140,000 electronic books.

Suddenly it’s December, and we’re approaching the end of a calendar year. Whatever you have planned over the festive season, I wish you all the very best, and look forward to many more electronic resource developments for 2017!

Wiley Online Library unavailable for four hours tomorrow, Saturday 17th December

December 16, 2016

Due to essential maintenance, Wiley Online Library will be unavailable for four hours tomorrow, Saturday 17th December, from 9.00 a.m. All other electronic resources will be available as normal.

Top articles of 2016 revealed

December 16, 2016

It doesn’t seem long ago that I talked about the top 100 journal articles for 2015 as ranked by analysis of altmetrics. Altmetrics – literally alternative metrics – explore the impact of research. To consider altmetrics is to look at how many times an article is tweeted about, how many likes it gets, how many times it is mentioned in the media, how often it is blogged about and whether or not it gets any Wikipedia mentions.

One of the organisations that measures impact in this way is Altmetrics: you may have seen the brightly-coloured ‘doughnuts’ appearing next to journal articles on some platforms. Each year, Altmetrics publishes its top 100 articles and just like last year, the results are fascinating. Something that struck me immediately was that many of the highest ranked articles this year concern world events and concerns: for example, in the No. 1 position is an article about Barack Obama. Others that appear in the top 20 include articles on the Zika Virus, and an article by Robin Williams’ widow on her late husband’s illness. Compare this to the 2015 list, which contained articles on equally emotive topics – for example, plastic waste in oceans and antibiotic resistance – but did not have as great an emphasis on what we might term articles relating to ‘popular culture’.

Of course, that might not indicate anything at all, but it’s interesting. Barack Obama has been very much in the news this year; the Zika Virus was another subject of intense media coverage. When people are looking for information on either of those topics, the likelihood is that they will turn to a search engine, and their search may well have led them to an open access, academic article.

A number of these are articles are open access articles, so they can be accessed without having to login to anything, and access does not depend on having an institutional subscription.

The full list of the top 100 articles as ranked by Altmetrics is available here.